Industrial Laser Solutions Editorial Advisor Anant Deshpande reports from LASER World of PHOTONICS India, held in

Industrial Laser Solutions Editorial Advisor Anant Deshpande reports from LASER World of PHOTONICS India, held in late September 2018. The annual LASER World of PHOTONICS India (LWoP India) trade fair was held September 26-28, 2018, at the Bangalore International Exhibition Centre (BIEC), and organized by Messe Muenchen India. This year’s show was much larger and better than last year, with more than 150 exhibitors from 13 countries. Exhibitors included leading players Trumpf, Coherent, IPG Photonics, Laserline, and Precitec, all making their presence felt. Integrators such as Suresh Indu, Scantech, Sahajanand Ahmedabad, Meera Laser, and Bradma were also present with their live demonstrations apart from leading representative companies in India that include Laser Science, Advance Photonics, ATOS, AMIL, and Precitec. The show had German and Chinese pavilions where, for example, Scanlab demonstrated its excelliSCAN scanning system and Raycus showcased its 6 kW fiber laser. Participation from Chinese companies was quite visible, as half of the show’s second hall featured laser companies including Raycus, Max Photonics, Shenzhen JPT Opto-Electronics, and CAS Laser, and complete mach...

When it comes to power tools, generally speaking more watts is better. But as laser maestro [Martin

When it comes to power tools, generally speaking more watts is better. But as laser maestro [Martin Raynsford] shows, watts aren’t everything. He shares a brief video showing his older 100 W laser being handily outperformed by a newer 30 W machine. Shouldn’t the higher power laser be able to do the same job in less time? One might think so, but wattage isn’t everything. The 30 W laser engraves and cuts a wooden tile in just under half the time it takes the 100 W machine to do the same job, and with a nicer end result, to boot. Why such a difference? Part of the answer to that question lies in that the newer machine has better motion control and can handle higher speeds, but the rest is due to the tubes themselves. The older 100 W machine uses a DC-excited (big glass water-cooled tube) CO2 laser, and the newer 30 W machine uses an RF-excited laser that looks a bit like a big metal heat sink instead of oversized lab glassware. Both tubes output what is essentially the same beam, but the RF tube is overall capable of a more refined, more stable, and more finely focused point than that of the glass tube. Since engraving uses only a small fraction of even the 30 W laser’s power, the ...